Personalized nutrition services to help you achieve your goals!

paul-romasco-health-coach

As some of you know, I not only provide personal training services, but I also specialize in nutritional services as well! If you feel like your progress has stalled, or you just don’t know where to begin, consider one of the following options:

Shopping List – A one-time list of the optimal foods to pick up every week at your specific market, farm, etc. This will include many options and alternatives so you can pick and choose foods that fit your preferences and budget.

Recipes – Pick an option of 1, 2, or 3 meal recipes per day. You can request 3 dinner recipes in 1 week; 5 breakfast ideas; or 3 meals and 1 snack for every day of the week – the meals, days, and numbers are up to you!

Food Log Analysis – I will provide a log for you to record your food intake for a minimum of 3 days. I will analyze it in terms of calories, carbs, fats, proteins, vitamins and minerals, share this information with you, and provide recommendations. The more details and specifics you include, the better my feedback will be! Include portion sizes, brands for packaged goods, etc.

Traditional Q & A / 1-on-1 Nutritional Counseling & Education – This can be in person or via email, text, or phone. We can either have a back and forth conversation, focused on your specific questions and concerns. Or it can be structured by me, basically conveying the most important information for your specific goals in terms of nutrition, hormones, sleep, etc.

I look forward to helping you achieve your goals!

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Be Careful What You Ask For: Q&A with Paul

Be Careful What you ask for...

Most questions I get come in through email or text, which is great for ensuring the specificity of my answer, but it also means all other readers miss out on the information. So, today will be the first post in my Careful What You Ask For series.

Question:

“What are the safety considerations for performing squats? Specifically, what application does the squat have for runners? And what concerns exist for individuals with arthritis?”

Answer:

Wow – applications and concerns for the squat, known as “the king of all movements!” This could be a pretty involved topic but I’ll do my best to stay on point.  

First off, let’s cover the basics:

The human body is meant to squat.

baby-squat

As soon as we can stand on two legs, we frequently sit in a deep squat position. Whenever we sit down and stand up from a chair, we are squatting. The legs and hips are some of the biggest and strongest muscles in the body not only to carry us long distances, but to offer a safe and powerful base for when we come to a rest and lower into a seated position.

However, like any other movement, the squat can be risky if performed incorrectly.

So, the best place to start is with proper “squat mechanics”

squat

  1. Stand with feet shoulder width apart, toes turned slightly out, weight evenly distributed through the ball of your feet, the pinky toe, and the heel.
  2. Reach hands out in front for counterbalance and push your hips / butt back, keeping your lower back arched in, and shoulders / chest up.
  3. As hips are lowering behind you, actively push knees out to the sides. Keeping the knees wide, and preventing them from caving in, will reduce any load on the knee and ACL.
  4. Keep sitting back and down, almost between your legs, until you reach depth. This is dependent upon specific hip structure, mobility, and experience. Stop descending if your lower back loses its arch and starts to round, if you start to tip / lose your balance, or if any part of your foot leaves the ground.
  5. The squat back up should be identical – knees wide, back arched, chest high and wide – until you are standing up straight, squeezing the butt and keeping the knees “soft” (not forcibly pushing the knees back, creating hyperextension a the knee joint).

A common training wheel of sorts would be to elevate the heels about 1 inch. This will allow you to sit deeper down, without feeling like you’re going to tip over or the extending the knees too far forward.

Next, let’s look at the specific application for runners.


Running is a sport that involves the body moving in one direction, often for many miles, with a great deal of impact. This will develop some muscles while leaving others completely passive and underdeveloped. The most concerning would be the glutes and the hamstrings.

Four-Steps-to-Good-Running-FormAny exercise moving the knee and leg away from the midline of the body will target the glutes and hips…but the squat may be the most effective option because it requires balance and postural awareness, while also engaging the rest of the muscles throughout the body.

My recommendation for a runner would be to become proficient in a bodyweight squat. Once 2 or 3 sets of 20 repetitions can be completed without breaking a sweat, add an elastic band around the knees, hold a dumbbell in front of the chest, or place a bar on the shoulders.

Progressing to barbell squats or a single-leg version would be a perfect goal for runners! If you want to run 26.2 miles without injury, it’s a good idea to first develop the balance, strength, and endurance to perform 20 squats on one leg.  

Remember my favorite quote from Tim Gould, Doctor of Physical Therapy: “Train to run, don’t run to train.”

And finally, does the presence of arthritis contraindicate squats?

Just to clarify, the form of arthritis determines the risks.

Degenerative arthritis is caused by a breaking down of the “padding” between bones. Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune condition where, simply put, offending foods have broken through the stomach lining and are wreaking havoc elsewhere in the body.

I’m going to assume we’re talking about degenerative arthritis since this is affected by activity and movement.

As always, you should consult your doctor first. No matter how cautious and properly a movement is performed, if your body doesn’t have enough cartilage to protect bones from grinding against one another, pain and further deterioration can occur.

Let’s assume that you can load and bend your knee without any pain. If so, performing a controlled squat may actually strengthen the muscles around the joints!

I have had quite a few clients with arthritis, and we usually make the following modifications:

  1. Progress slower, only adding 2 repetitions per set every week.  
  2. Don’t hold any one position too long. Normally, doing a pause squat, where you sit Squat-2and stay tight in the bottom for a count, improves mobility and strength. But the longer you “hang out” in one position, the more likely your muscles will get tired, transferring the load to the bones and joints.
  3. Allow for more recovery and emphasize diet. Degenerative arthritis cannot be cured through diet like rheumatoid, but consuming enough vitamin D & K, magnesium, iron, and collagen (found in gelatin), can help improve bone health.
  4. And finally, never allow one bad repetition! If your knee joint is lacking its natural cushion, we don’t want even a millisecond to be spent in a suboptimal position.

In summary, the inclusion of properly executed squats can help improve running performance, as well as prevent injuries. Squats can also build the strength and stability of soft-tissues around the joints and improve bone density, thereby benefiting those with arthritis.

How you structure your squat training is up to you – some like to heavy barbell squats once a week, while others prefer to complete 20 repetitions of bodyweight squats at random on a daily basis.

If you need any hands-on guidance learning how to squat or developing a safe and effective program, just let me know!

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New Year’s Resolutions

Happy New Year!

A new year is usually welcomed in by resolutions to eat better, workout regularly, and make other lifestyle improvements. However, laying out end goals is not enough. The most important part is planning out how an improvement will be accomplished.

For this reason, I have planned out my next year of training.

This doesn’t mean I know exactly what I’ll do everyday. Nor does it guarantee highly specific results by a certain date.

It does provide the structure and accountability to ensure that I am healthier, stronger, and more fit than I am now.

Planning out very specific numbers in terms of strength, bodyweight, or other health markers, can be counterproductive. Life is filled with unpredictable events. Sickness, injury, responsibilities, and individual genes make it impossible to foresee even one month into the future, never mind a whole year.

Developing general goals, and dedicating some thought to how they will be reached, is far more effective than merely listing a handful of numbers or end goals.

For example, my general training plan is as follows:

January and February: reintroduce barbell powerlifts such as the squat, bench press, deadlift, overhead press, and power clean. Train full body 3 days a week, practicing each exercise multiple times a week. Start light to allow for weight increases almost every session.

This will allow me to develop technical proficiency and regain strength, after which I’ll test my 1-rep max for these 5 exercises.

March and April: continue to train full body 3 days a week but vary the intensity each session. At this point, the weight for each lift will be getting heavier so, to prevent burnout, I will have light, moderate, and heavy days. I will also have to slow my rate of progression to a weekly basis.

May and June: increase the number of training days but decrease the frequency of each lift. Focus more on finding weaknesses to target with specific assistance exercises. Finally, dial weight progression back even further to a monthly schedule.

I have an idea what I’ll do after June but to allow for the unpredictability of life, I haven’t fleshed it out enough to post publicly.

That is my physical fitness program for the next 6 months. Notice anything that’s missing? Nutrition and all other health goals!

This week, I have greatly dialed back my caloric intake, and carbohydrate level in particular, to recover from the indulgences of the holidays. However, during the first few months of this year, I will slowly increase my calories from carbs. This will allow me to build quality muscle and increase my strength.

Around April, I’ll shift my body into ketosis to improve my fat metabolism, lean out, and allow for cell repair within my body. By summer I hope to be stronger and more fit than I was at the same time last year.

I will also be tracking my blood levels, as always, and continue to donate blood on a regular schedule.

If you notice, I have not listed many specific numbers. I do have a few numbers in my mind, but I don’t want to tie them to specific dates and become disheartened when things out of my control get in the way.

Don’t make absolute statements or enormous changes without a way to track progress and ensure success. Look at a calendar, assess where you are now, and find a way to make improvements on a regularly basis.

Hiring a professional will make this process easier and more effective by providing accountability along with the experience and knowledge to guide decisions. Feel free to contact me directly if you are ready to start improving any aspect of your life.

In conclusion: having goals is good, but having a plan is better.

resolution

How to lift without “Getting Bulky”

paulromasco-com

 

My personal goals involve increasing muscle mass, reducing body fat, and performing heavy barbell lifts.

However, the majority of my clients do not share these goals. Most of my clients want to lose weight, regain function, improve posture, and reverse disease.

In fact, one of the most frequent concerns I hear from those trying to get in shape is that they “don’t want to get big muscles”.

For that reason, I’m going to discuss what causes muscle growth, and how you can avoid getting bulky muscles while still leaning out and improving performance.

The technical term for developing muscle size is “muscular hypertrophy”. Hypertrophy is merely the process of tissues increasing in volume. And the form of muscular hypertrophy that results in the largest muscular gains is “sarcoplasmic hypertrophy”.

Strictly speaking, 8 to 12 repetitions with a moderate weight is the protocol for hypertrophy training. However, intensity and volume are the real deciding factors.

Intensity is accomplished by working until the muscles can no longer perform the exercise properly, known as “failure”, and moving quickly between sets.

Volume is an equation of sets, reps, and weight. This means that 2 sets of 20 repetitions

Olympics_2012_Women's_75kg_Weightlifting.jpg

Female Olympian in the 165 lb. weight class. Does SHE look bulky?

with 5 pounds will result in more growth stimulus than 3 sets of 1 repetition with 50 pounds.

I personally perform an exercise for 4 sets of 15 repetitions if I am trying to increase muscle size. Almost any load can cause significant growth when performed for 15 slow and focused repetitions.

I bring up the topic of intensity to address those that avoid lifting heavy weights because they don’t want to bulk up. The classic bodybuilder approach of 8 to 12 repetitions means that “heavy weights” (relative to the individuals strength) cannot be used.

BulkyThe weights that bodybuilders handle may look heavy but this is merely because they are very strong and have been lifting, with regular improvement, for a long time. It may look like a bench press with two 75-pound dumbbells looks heavy, but if the individual is doing it for 8 or more reps, they could handle over 100-pound dumbbells for fewer reps.

Contrarily, lifting a massively heavy weight for fewer than 5 repetitions will actually train the mind more than the muscles. Yes, the body is getting a great workout, but lifting a maximum load for 1, 2, or 3 repetitions results in more neurological adaptations than muscular growth.

So, if any rep range can stimulate muscle growth, and 8 to 12 reps with a moderately-heavy weight is the most promising to grow muscles, what can you do to avoid “bulking up”?

  • Always feel like you could do 2 to 5 more repetitions with perfect form. The moment you go to failure, and technique breaks down, you are causing muscular damage that will result in the muscle growing larger during recovery.
  • Also, take the time you need to rest between sets. Many bodybuilder programs recommend timed recoveries under 60 seconds, sometimes as low as 15 seconds. Starting your next set before the muscles are ready is a surefire way to stimulate muscle growth.
  • Finally, don’t consume excess calories! One of the main goals of exercising is to increase lean body mass, but, if you don’t want your muscles to grow considerably larger, eat at, or even below, maintenance so your body replaces fat with lean mass.

One last point worth making is regarding “toning”. The same people that say they don’t want to “grow muscles” say that they “only want to tone”. Believe it or not, tone means muscle! There is no way to make fat or skin look “toned”. The definition or tone visible on a fit persons arms, legs, or torso, is actually their muscle.

This doesn’t mean that you have to train like a bodybuilder and put on 50 pounds of muscle to looked toned… but replacing body fat with lean body mass (also known as muscle) is necessary to achieve a fit physique.

The world of fitness, nutrition, and health is filled with mixed messages, preconceived notions, and bogus ideas. But please don’t give any mind to the false claims that lifting weights and increasing strength will make you bulky!

If you work within your limits, have a program structured to your goals, and don’t eat to excess, you will achieve a healthy and proportionate figure.

And as always, if you would like professional guidance, please don’t hesitate to e-mail me at paulromasco@hotmail.com !

 

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Why Work With A Personal Trainer?

Personal training is a relatively new profession. A few decades ago, the only people that had trainers were athletes or models earning millions of dollars a year. But now, the fitness industry is one of the fastest growing sectors of the economy.

What changed?

Simply put, the public realized that more activity than our daily lives provided was necessary to live a healthy life. In addition, structuring physical activity long-term requires guidance by professionals trained in the human sciences.

Doctors are now recommending patients hire a trainer to help them get fit and stay active. We have started realizing that the standard advice promoting pharmaceuticals and refined foods is not helping the public. Doctors are now recommending patients with severe conditions to seek out the guidance of trainers and nutritionists. It’s becoming understood that personal trainers and nutritionists have more time and energy to dedicate to staying on top of new research and changing science.

But, without a doctors order, why would an individual seek out a personal trainer?

Goal Setting:

In a world filled with photo shopped models and over-sexualized media, it’s hard to figure out exactly what is healthy. Your trainer can help you specify realistic and healthy goals.

Getting Started:

There are millions of articles and suggestions detailing what to do for physical activity, and there are even more movements and specific exercises to utilize. A trainer can take your specific goals, limitations, history, preferences, and time constraints to tailor a program for you.

Education:

Most personal trainers have spent years studying the human body, movement patterns, and kinesiology. Some have educated themselves even further in the field of biomechanics or bio-molecular chemistry.
Keep in mind that not all education is equal though. Look for a trainer that has a college degree in the human sciences or a certification accredited by the NCCA (ACSM, NSCA, NASM, ACE, etc).

Empowerment:

Continuing from the last point, a properly educated trainer will be able to impart their knowledge to you, allowing you to structure your own routines and stay consistent over the long-term.

Rehabilitation & Avoiding Injury:

One final point regarding the education trainers go through – they will be able to help you recover from, or work around, any injuries, restrictions, or limitations you may have.
If you do not have any injuries or other issues, your trainer will ensure that your exercises are safe and effective, thereby avoiding any risk of injury from improper technique or overtraining.

Motivation & Support:

Your trainer will work with you to find what motivates you most! They will help keep you on track, providing a push when needed, or recommending a rest when necessary.
As previously mentioned, many personal trainers are up-to-date on the newest science involving nutrition and other factors, meaning they will be able to support you in every way to help ensure a healthy lifestyle.

Avoiding Boredom:

For many people, going through the same motions and exercises day-to-day will lead to loss of interest, and eventually lack of adherence. A good personal trainer will be able to keep your routines fresh enough to keep you focused, but still consistent enough to track progress.

Making Progress:

Finally, a personal trainer will be able to help you make constant progress over the course of your entire life.

The body will acclimate to any single stimulus in about 4-16 weeks, causing the individual to plateau. Many people will keep pushing, leading to injury, or simply assume they have reached their “limit”. However, if you have well-educated trainer, they will find a simple and effective way to make it possible for you to see continual progress.

There are countless studies proving the benefit of professional guidance, but a very telling and recent study showed that over the course of 10 weeks, individuals working with a trainer increased their strength by 10%, while those without a trainer experienced no improvement. The “novice affect” shows that most strength will be gained in the first 8 weeks of training, but this study was done on already fit and active individuals…yet they still made significant progress.

There are many other reasons to hire a personal trainer but these are the ones that come to mind from my time as a personal trainer.

Almost everyone has a doctor and a dentist, some people have an accountant or a lawyer, and others even have a masseuse or personal assistant. A personal trainer is just one more member of this team that works to serve and benefit you. The only difference with a personal trainer is that they can help keep you healthy for every minute of every day, for your entire life.

So, give it a try today! Look through the trainers available your local gym, investigate their credentials, and pick one you think you’d work best with. After that, the results will speak for themselves!