What I’ve Been Up To: Training Evolution

What I've been up to (1)

In my last post I discussed how my diet changed over the last year. After building my body up to 200 pounds, I trimmed excess body fat, settling at 185 pounds with under 15% body-fat.

Today, let’s look at how my training has evolved, both inside and outside of the gym.

A discovery I made, well over a year ago, was that I had very weak glutes, immobile ankles/calves, and significant external rotation of my femurs.

Starting with isometrics, constant balance and postural work, and abduction exercise (moving legs laterally from the body), I was able to build up the stabilizers throughout my hips and legs. I moved on to strengthening my posterior chain (hamstrings, glutes, hips, and lower back) with more classic strength exercises in the gym. c38aea10a40c31734d76e09933886e86

With the strength and neurological proprioception I developed, I jumped into a novice program known as Starting Strength. This program included back squats 3 days a week, adding 5 pounds a session – bringing my squat from an easy starting weight of 185 to around 275 in only 2 months.

As it got tougher to increase my squat 15lbs a week, I moved to my favorite undulating periodization program: 5/3/1. This got my squat to around 315 after a few more months.

Finally, I switched to a conjugate based system – two days a week focused on developing explosive speed on the bench press and squat and two days for max attempts on these lifts.

Through addressing my weaknesses, building my strength back up with improved form, and well calculated programming, I was able to set new records in the 4 major lifts that are vital for proper human movement – I deadlifted 405lbs, squatted 350lbs, benched 275lbs, and pressed 175lbs overhead!

I timed this peak in strength with the peak of my bulking cycle I discussed in my last post. Any lifter will tell you – if you want to put 10lbs on a lift, put 10lbs of mass on your body! Haha.

Knowing that I would soon start reducing calories, I transitioned to a classic images“bodybuilding” program – starting sessions with a heavy lift to maintain my strength, but then dedicating the rest of the workout to higher reps, moderate weight, and short rests. This is the perfect formula for stimulating muscle growth, which can prevent loss of muscle as bodyweight is lowered.

This style of training also allowed a much-needed break from the neurological recruitment involved in lifting maximal weights. All I had to do in the gym was close my eyes and focus on the stretch and contraction of specific muscles – quite meditative in a way.

I ended with a program developed in the early 1900’s by nowdeceased trainer Vince Gironda (“The Iron Guru”). His program involved 6 sets of 6 reps with only 15 seconds rest. Over the course of six weeks I worked up to 8 sets of 8 reps, still with only enough time for 3 deep breathes between sets. And trust me, after completing 64 repetitions in about 8 minutes, any weight feels heavy!

During this time I also replaced high intensity interval training (HIIT) with steady state aerobics such as biking and running. I did this to get some endurance training and take advantage of the gorgeous Vermont mornings and evenings. As a “strength athlete” at heart, I only run twice a week – with Wednesday’s focused on increasing my 1 mile speed and Saturday’s adding 1 minute out and back each week.

At the moment, I’m running an Olympic weightlifting program for the first time in my life. This involves the “clean and jerk” and “snatch”, variations of these movements, and different styles of squats almost every day.

 

black-weight-liftingOlympic lifting requires superb athleticism, speed, and mobility. I have built up my raw strength, pushing or pulling a heavy weight, often grinding to complete a rep…but this new style of training should help train other movement pathways within the body.

So far it is going excellent! I am feeling more agile and mobile from these full body, technical lifts. I plan to continue for another month or two in order to get enough exposure to this new style of training.

But honestly, I’m eager to return to powerlifting – I’ve got to get my squat to two times bodyweight (close to 400lbs), my deadlift to 500, bench press to 315, and achieve a bodyweight overhead press!

I’ve already got the basic outline for 3 particularly programs I will use over the next 6+ months to reach these goals.

And that’s what trainings all about: doing what you love; throwing in some new stuff to ensure balanced development; and proper programming. As long as you are consistent day-in and day-out, you can expect to improve from one year to the next.

As always, feel free to reach out to me with any questions or if you want a program designed for your particular needs. I wouldn’t be where I am without the valuable information I’ve learned from others – I only wish to provide the same value to all of you!

Thanks again for reading! See you next time when I wrap up this series with more lifestyle development, including changes to my recovery techniques, supplementation, and day-to-day life.

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