Steamed Mussels

steamed mussels

Let’s try a new topic for today’s post – a quick and simple recipe for one of the most nutritious and tasty meals you can eat – steamed mussels!

Two of the biggest barriers to healthy eating are cost and time. With this meal, neither of those should be an issue.

Mussels are one of the few creatures that can be “farm-raised” without any major detriment to their life and resulting nutritional quality. Farm-raised fish are fed diets of soy and corn or forced to grow in overpopulated areas. However, mussels attach to a surface and filter their food from the water so there is little need for producers to manipulate their development.  For this reason, you will be able to find affordable frozen bags of mussels in the pre-packaged seafood section of your market. One market near me always has 3 lbs for $5.99.

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Now, to the kitchen:

Pour mussels directly into large empty pot

Cover and cook on high for 10-15 minutes

Once mussels have opened, uncover and remove from heat

While they cool, melt a few tablespoons of grass-fed butter in frying pan

Add crushed garlic, chopped shallots, Italian seasonings, cherry tomatoes, salt and pepper

Separate soft edible parts of mussels from shell and toss in butter and seasonings for a minute

Turn off heat and place spinach or other green leafy vegetables on top of mussels and cover

Let sit for 5 minutes as greens cook down

Optional: Add a few tablespoons of olive oil and vinegar before serving

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Counting prep time, this should take less than 30 minutes. I made these over the weekend and portioned them out as my lunches for Tuesday and Thursday. They have been amazing!

Now, to the lab:

Haha, I crack myself up. But in all seriousness, I did want to share the unbelievable nutrient quality of mussels. Just 3 ounces of mussels, maybe half a serving, contains the following:

700mg Omega 3 and 20g protein

15 – 30 % of Vitamin C; Thiamin; Riboflavin; Folate; Niacin; Zinc; Iron; and Phosphorus needs for the day

100% Selenium; 300% Manganese; and 340% Vitamin B12

Selenium, Manganese, and Vitamin B deficiencies are extremely common in the United States. Also, considering their high-quality protein and omega-3 content, they are the perfect food to round out a pesco-vegetarian diet.

For these nutritional reasons, as well as the rich buttery taste, I prepare a couple dishes of mussels every month or two.

I hope this post, albeit shorter, proves to be even more practical. Like everything else: experiment! If it tastes good to you, that’s all that matters!

Enjoy!

One thought on “Steamed Mussels

  1. Pingback: Review of New York Times Article | Paul Romasco

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